History of Nougat

Nougat is a traditional confectionery dating back to the 1700s. Made with honey, glucose, sucrose, roasted nuts (almonds, pistachios, hazelnuts and more recently macadamia nuts are common), and dried fruits.

The consistency of nougat can range from soft and chewy to hard and crunchy depending on its composition. The word nougat comes from Occitan pan nogat (Occitan pronunciation: [panuˈɣat]), which means nutbread.

There are three basic kinds of nougat: The first, and most common, is white nougat (which appeared in Cremona, Italy in the early 15th century and later in Montélimar, France, in the 18th century) is made with beaten egg whites and honey.

The second is brown nougat (referred to as “mandorlato” in Italy and nougatine in French) is made without egg whites and has a firmer, often crunchy texture. The third is the Viennese or German nougat which is essentially a chocolate and nut (usually hazelnut) praline.

Our nougat recipe is French inspired with a creaminess and chewiness unlike any other. Our secret recipe is closely guarded amongst family members and hand made in small batches ensuring our nougat is always of the highest standard.

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